Reel line set-up

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Reel line set-up

Postby Mario1911 » January 13th, 2018, 1:00 pm

I am curious what your reel line set-up is and why you run it that way.

In the past I’ve used swivels, bungies, ran just shooting line and probably any other way you can imagine.

For the past two years or so I’ve been running a very simple knot with out any issues. I am curious if anyone else is running your reel line like this.

It’s a simple double sheet bend/ weaver knot. I’ve shot all my fish without any issues. Yet... guess that’s the key word.

I am interested in what your thoughts on this set-up are.
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Re: Reel line set-up

Postby Atanas Baitchev » January 13th, 2018, 9:48 pm

I like to run a swivel snap clip. Unclip the shooting line, reclip the swivel (very important), swim the fish up, then reel the line back in. Saves you doing a zillion dives to cut a fish out most of the time.
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Re: Reel line set-up

Postby John Hughes » January 13th, 2018, 9:54 pm

Mario1911 wrote:I am curious what your reel line set-up is and why you run it that way.

In the past I’ve used swivels, bungies, ran just shooting line and probably any other way you can imagine.

For the past two years or so I’ve been running a very simple knot with out any issues. I am curious if anyone else is running your reel line like this.

It’s a simple double sheet bend/ weaver knot. I’ve shot all my fish without any issues. Yet... guess that’s the key word.

I am interested in what your thoughts on this set-up are.


The strength of that knot may be good Mario, but the main issue I can see with that setup is going to be the tag end of your mono. Crimping is always best because it's CLEAN. Bending that mono back and inserting any type of knot is creating a long loose tag end on your mono. When you take your shot and that mono flips forward, that loose tag end V is now facing your bands. That knot may hold when you come tight the fish, but that fish is going to take your gun when that V catches your wishbones on your band on the way out. I hope that makes sense.

Heres a quote and a situation that was recently posted on another thread here that explains what I'm talking about.

I had rushed through rigging a shooting line the other night and rather than look for the right tool, I just grabbed my crimper and used the line clipper to trim the line down to the crimp. But this does not make a perfect flush cut like a scissor.. I figured what could possibly go wrong.. So I'm in this Rip today pulling me out to sea and thinking this feels fishy.. I make a drop and sure enough here comes my target species. I place a good shot and my Slip Tip Toggles on the other side and the fish takes off. But something is wrong.. and I'm getting pulled pretty good down and out. So that littttttle Y formed from that litttle nub of extra mono sticking out of the crimp has caught my band wishbone..and this in turn has created a tangle. I have already reviewed these scenarios in my head, so I think 1,2,3,4. Try to release the Tangle. If not. Grab the reel line from the Reel guide, loosen the drag and swim up with the line playing through my fingers, If not. Cut the line. If not. Let go. Luckily I was able to undo the tangle and then the fish sped off with a whole lot of reel line. He's neatly packaged into 8 dinners for the family in the freezer now. But it was a learning point so I figured to share.
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One reason I've always stuck to a snap swivel is it makes it much easier to disconnect your mono when you have a fish tied up or you just need to pull your mono through a dead fish rather that take your slip tip or shaft out of the fish when back on the surface or at the boat. It also keeps all your connections clean avoiding the problem above.
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Re: Reel line set-up

Postby Behslayer » January 13th, 2018, 11:14 pm

The above situation was using a snap swivel. But it was the Crimped end of my mono shooting line that had a Littttttle tail and that rigid mono grabbed my wishbone. The Snap Swivel could have grabbed it as well. The only truly clean join is reel line as shooting line.. or atleast a Dyneema to Mono join with a shrink wrap or electrical tape covering but those don't allow a snap and release. When I used to use my reel line as my shooting line I just tied an Overhand knot as my stopper and this was nice as I could pull it out a little so the knot would also trail behind the gun. If I need to unstring a fish, just cut off the knot, and then tye another. easy enough.

Regarding that Knot.. No I wouldn't use it. Because.. it's not the strongest knot for the job, and it exposes the crux of the Mono to bad things like bone strikes, etc. So if you do shoot the best fish of your life and all hell breaks loose.. the last thing you are going to want to be relying on is a knot that was not the best choice for the job. One other thing is that I sheath all my mono joins with a nylon Chafe Guard and this wouldn't allow that knot. I would use that knot for removeable Wishbones but I'd burn that end down to a nub.
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Re: Reel line set-up

Postby Bill McIntyre » January 14th, 2018, 9:37 am

Atanas Baitchev wrote:I like to run a swivel snap clip. Unclip the shooting line, reclip the swivel (very important), swim the fish up, then reel the line back in. Saves you doing a zillion dives to cut a fish out most of the time.


Me too.
email me at wsbhtr@cox.net
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Re: Reel line set-up

Postby Mario1911 » January 14th, 2018, 4:02 pm

Thanks everyone. I appreciate the feedback.
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