Fish Collars

Epic mealtime ideas

Fish Collars

Postby chris oak » May 16th, 2017, 8:13 pm

I have no idea why I never posted this or why I can't find any of my pix either. For those of you who have never tried them, grilled fish collars are often the best and most overlooked part of the fish. At a Japanese restaurant it is not uncommon for a grilled collar to go for 20 bucks. Fish collars are super oily, like the dark meat of chicken but even better. They are one of my favorite parts of the fish.

To process a large fish I did a video a while back here and there is a collar removal part as well:
If you need a tutorial on collar removal there is also a topic here, it shows the flap that makes it all so much easier:
http://www.spearingforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=4764&p=53009&hilit=removing+collars#p53009 I know Hughes also went into depth about it but I can't find the link, that flap makes separating out the head super easy.

Once you remove the collars you want to clean off as much of the blood as possible. I only rinse my fish in salt water (for salt water fish) as the osmotic balance is disrupted with fresh water and you will get a grainy appearance on the outer layer of meat. I usually cut off the pectoral and pelvic fins because for some reason if those don't cook it brings a slime taste to the fish. On a very large collar I will also cut slits in the meat to help the marinade soak in. You can choose to scale or not scale it, I leave mine unscaled.

There are two methods but you can basically skip the bbq and just go to the oven.

If you have a bbq:
Once your fish has marinaded for a bit (the longer the better, sometimes I'll do a two day marinade) you want to fire up your bbq and let the coals get red. If it's a gas one like mine I wait till the temp gets to about 300 degrees. Put your fish flesh down first for a few minutes, it will sear it closed so the marinade seals in a bit. Then flip it and do it skin side up. More than likely it will never cook through if it's a big fish, you will end up burning part of it, but if you are careful you can do it slow until done and then serve. I do it a way Mori taught me where you grill it first and then transfer it into a over.

Once you get those nice grill marks and a bit smoky appearance, make sure your oven is preheated to 350. Put the fish in a baking pan skin side down and cook it until the meat flakes. You are done. If you don't have a bbq or are lazy like me, then just cook the fish skin side down in the oven until it's done. When it's done turn on the broiler and leave it on until the fish gets that really dark preburn look, it tastes almost as good as doing it on the bbq first.

Marinades:
There are two types I normally do, and again you want to cut slits into the fish meat so it will soak up better.

1. Soak your fish in Italian salad dressing either overnight or at least a few hours, the longer the better. Remove it. Sprinke on Garlic Powder, Onion Powder and Lawrys seasoned salt and rub it in. Then do the bbq or oven method until done.

2. Teriyaki/smoke marinade. Mix equal parts of brown and soy sauce about a half cup each. Keep tasting this and adding sugar until it is sweet, then add a tiny bit more, you want it a little sweeter than you like because it changes later. Add about a tablespoon of onion powder. Add about a tablespoon of garlic powder. Add 1 tsp pepper. Mix thoroughly.
Take your fish and marinade in it overnight. Then place the fish on a baking pan skin side down and pour some more of the sauce on top. Throw it on the bbq and do the bbq/bake recipe as above or else just put it in the oven until it is done and flaky. Then turn on the broiler for a few minutes until it carmelizes.
Attachments
User avatar
chris oak
Enforcer
 
Posts: 4507
Joined: June 2013

Re: Fish Collars

Postby rhyne » May 17th, 2017, 7:09 am

:hi5: great timing as I have a pair of big ol tuna collars chilling in the fridge for tonight :) ... this is my favorite part of a yellowtail/whiteseabass and tuna. there's one little strip of meat somewhere in the middle that is my particular favorite. not sure how to explain it, but I wouldn't be surprised if someone is sitting at your keyboard going, yep... I know that piece! it always seems to be just perfectly cooked, plump, juicy and delicious. kinda like getting a big ol hunk of king crab that comes out in one perfect lump. mmmmm mmmmmm
User avatar
rhyne
spearo
 
Posts: 239
Joined: August 2013
Location: San Diego

Re: Fish Collars

Postby phil herranen » May 17th, 2017, 7:21 am

When I shot my bsb each collar was around 10# or more , I kept one and gave a friend the other . There was enuff meat on it for around 6 people .

I save all the collars from my smaller fish too and then will invite a bunch of people over and just have drinks and grill up 40 or 50 random collars
User avatar
phil herranen
Herranen Spearguns
 
Posts: 789
Joined: July 2013
Location: santa cruz

Re: Fish Collars

Postby Steve G » May 17th, 2017, 7:41 pm

Good video. For me collars are something to have with a beer. I cook them first and pick at them while BBQing shoulder cuts for dinner. The wife doesn't care for the fatty taste so they are all mine.
Steve G
kook
 
Posts: 540
Joined: July 2013

Re: Fish Collars

Postby rhyne » May 18th, 2017, 9:12 am

that's a great idea Phil... kinda like eating wings, but better :handgestures-thumbupleft:

Here's a pic from last nights meal...
Collars= soy sauce, ponzu sauce, ginger, garlic, fresh lime
Spicy BFT on the side
yum
Attachments
User avatar
rhyne
spearo
 
Posts: 239
Joined: August 2013
Location: San Diego

Re: Fish Collars

Postby castronova » May 18th, 2017, 10:09 am

phil herranen wrote:When I shot my bsb each collar was around 10# or more , I kept one and gave a friend the other . There was enuff meat on it for around 6 people .

I save all the collars from my smaller fish too and then will invite a bunch of people over and just have drinks and grill up 40 or 50 random collars


Thats awesome. I've only done this once but should really be doing it with every fish.

Are you all doing this with scaly fish? Just scale them first? Or do you not worry about it and eat it right off the other side?
User avatar
castronova
prick
 
Posts: 823
Joined: August 2013
Location: The Conch Republic

Re: Fish Collars

Postby phil herranen » May 20th, 2017, 7:37 am

castronova wrote:
phil herranen wrote:When I shot my bsb each collar was around 10# or more , I kept one and gave a friend the other . There was enuff meat on it for around 6 people .

I save all the collars from my smaller fish too and then will invite a bunch of people over and just have drinks and grill up 40 or 50 random collars


Thats awesome. I've only done this once but should really be doing it with every fish.

Are you all doing this with scaly fish? Just scale them first? Or do you not worry about it and eat it right off the other side?


I normaly just leave the scales on . When I'm processing fish I will fillet ,then cut out the collars , and throw all the collars from that day into a couple bags and into the freezer . I only scale fish like salmon where I like to eat the skin . Or if I'm going to salt crust bake the fish or cook it whole some other way .

Here is a collar I did in the smoker last night
Attachments
User avatar
phil herranen
Herranen Spearguns
 
Posts: 789
Joined: July 2013
Location: santa cruz

Re: Fish Collars

Postby John Hughes » May 24th, 2017, 4:25 am

here's the link that shows you where the hinge is on the collar. It makes it tremendously easier to remove. Some fish are easier than others to find the hinge as the skin covers it up on some fish like yellowtail. Seabass is easy. Definitely one of the best parts of the fish to eat although some collars for me tend to be too fishy (like yellowtail)
I usually cut the membrane off the meat side of the fish before cooking and just sprinkle some lemon pepper on it and throw it on the grill whole. It's really hard to overcook as it's so oily.
viewtopic.php?f=18&t=1243
User avatar
John Hughes
cupcake
 
Posts: 3494
Joined: July 2013
Location: san pedro

Re: Fish Collars

Postby castronova » May 30th, 2017, 10:41 am

Well hell. Did a 180 mile round trip overnight. Crushed it and had tons of fish to filet. Took 4 of us about 3-4 hours to finish. I couldn't get the collar off each fish but cut off 5 I think of the bigger fish, Amberjacks, black and red grouper. While we finished cleaning the boat I fired up the smoker. Covered the meat in Lawry's seasoning salt, thats it. I smoked the Amberjack collar for about 1.5 hours with Sea Grape wood. Took it off the smoker and put it on the grill for about 30 minutes.

Absolutely insane how good the meat came out. We ate that with some grilled Elon sausage a friend of mine shot.

I wanted to dive in the canal and pull all the carcasses out that I didn't remove the collars from. Thanks to all who have informed and enlightened me on this. I'm forever thankful.
Image
Image
Image
User avatar
castronova
prick
 
Posts: 823
Joined: August 2013
Location: The Conch Republic

Re: Fish Collars

Postby Nate Baker » May 30th, 2017, 1:06 pm

John Hughes wrote:here's the link that shows you where the hinge is on the collar. It makes it tremendously easier to remove. Some fish are easier than others to find the hinge as the skin covers it up on some fish like yellowtail. Seabass is easy. Definitely one of the best parts of the fish to eat although some collars for me tend to be too fishy (like yellowtail)
I usually cut the membrane off the meat side of the fish before cooking and just sprinkle some lemon pepper on it and throw it on the grill whole. It's really hard to overcook as it's so oily.
viewtopic.php?f=18&t=1243



Yeah John, your tip about that joint was a game changer for me. It's so much easier than sawing through the collar.

I typically bake the collars. I just sprinkle them with Lawry's Seasoned Salt and bake for 25 minutes at 350. It takes about as long to cook and cool as it takes me to vacuum seal a seabass (or yellowtail) worth of chunks.

After they're cool enough to handle I strip the meat off and throw it in tupperware. Then I can throw the leftover hard parts in with the rest of the carcass for disposal. I'll treat the meat as "tuna salad". But it's not dry and sawdusty and disgusting like canned tuna.
User avatar
Nate Baker
kook
 
Posts: 679
Joined: July 2013

Re: Fish Collars

Postby John Hughes » June 1st, 2017, 4:52 am

Glad I could help you out Nate!
User avatar
John Hughes
cupcake
 
Posts: 3494
Joined: July 2013
Location: san pedro

Re: Fish Collars

Postby gringo sushi » June 3rd, 2017, 8:55 pm

Collars and belly are a favorite in my home. The kids devour them and I can't think of a food I enjoy a cold beer with more.

I like to turn the 45 degree cut once I pass the pectoral fin to include the belly to keep it all in one piece

Todd Farquhar
LB Neptune
tfarquhar@me.com

“There is one thing which gives radiance to everything. It is the idea of something around the corner.” G.K. Chesterton
User avatar
gringo sushi
spearo
 
Posts: 242
Joined: August 2013
Location: So Cal

Re: Fish Collars

Postby castronova » June 5th, 2017, 4:56 am

Finally got to the grouper yesterday. It was also delicious but had a bite here and there that was super fishy out of nowhere. Not sure if it's because It had a little blood still on it (that I washed off but it froze with it). My wife and sister loved it though so thats a win.

I will also add that John's trick where the hinge is located is extremely helpful. I definitely would have struggled a lot more had I not known that.

User avatar
castronova
prick
 
Posts: 823
Joined: August 2013
Location: The Conch Republic

Re: Fish Collars

Postby db1 » July 6th, 2017, 9:30 pm

I love collars, marinated and grilled epic... but my favorite is smoked. I have an artichoke/spinach dip that I do with smoked collar meat in it... so good... I'll post that recipe up soon... when I have some time to write it up.

Great thread
db1
prick
 
Posts: 735
Joined: August 2013

Re: Fish Collars

Postby John Hughes » July 9th, 2017, 5:02 am

castronova wrote:Finally got to the grouper yesterday. It was also delicious but had a bite here and there that was super fishy out of nowhere. Not sure if it's because It had a little blood still on it (that I washed off but it froze with it). My wife and sister loved it though so thats a win.

I will also add that John's trick where the hinge is located is extremely helpful. I definitely would have struggled a lot more had I not known that.

collar.jpg


I've noticed that some fish collars are definitely fishier than others. Most guys here love yellowtail collars but they are too fishy for me personally. Your comment about the blood has me thinking I should give it another try though. I'm a freak about bleeding my fish because I'm convinced that's where the fishy comes from. It is important to get all that off and there's a lot of it on collars where they attach to the gills. Maybe I should try a better clean on the collar before freezing or eating. Thanks for the comment JP and I'm glad the tip worked for you!

I love the food pic too, that looks killer!
User avatar
John Hughes
cupcake
 
Posts: 3494
Joined: July 2013
Location: san pedro


Return to Recipes

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users

  • Supported by