Transom Savers on boats

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Transom Savers on boats

Postby chris oak » April 20th, 2015, 10:23 am

I was thinking about this when we were just talking about trailers. For those of you guys who have outboards, how are you supporting the engine during transport? I've heard that over long distances it's not recommended to use the kickstand. On my previous honda 4 stroke I made pvc rods that were cushioned on the hydrolic pegs. On my yamaha there are no pegs that you can do that on so I was using the regular trailer saver and it just busted and was dragging on the road. I ordered a new one but was also looking at the "my wedge" types.

After my transom saver crapped out and was shooting sparks all over (it's very unnerving to have some guy flag you and roll down your window on the freeway and he says "hey something broke on your motor and is dragging on the ground") I pulled it off and just used the kickstand on the remainder of the drive home but it kept the motor waaay up where it looked like it was putting a lot of stress on the transom.
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Re: Transom Savers on boats

Postby Logan » April 20th, 2015, 12:59 pm

I used the yamaha version of the "my wedge" on my previous F115 and it seemed to work fine and was very convenient to use/store:
http://www.simyamaha.com/Yamaha_Engine_ ... -ym-10.htm

I recently got a new boat with a F200 and it came with a transom saver bar from the previous owner. My personal belief is that you absolutely should use something, whether it is the wedge or the bar or scrap of wood, for two reasons:

1) If your hydraulics give out, you want something as a backup keeping your lower unit off the ground. At least for Yamaha's, that little support lever is not designed to be used for trailering and shouldn't be (unless your transom saver breaks and you have no choice) Also, see reason #2 for why your hydraulics are more likely to give out...

2) I know some may disagree, but I am fairly confident that the shock loads generated by driving over bumps and potholes can exceed (perhaps by a wide margin) the forces that your motor can generate and therefore you do need something to help mitigate these forces on your transom/hydraulics. To a large extent these are reduced by your trailer suspension, but adding some additional cushioning under the outboard (wedge) or supporting the outboard lower unit (transom saver) to reduce the moments generated by these forces is a good idea.

As to your question about transom saver vs wedge, I'm not sure. The wedge style or 2x4 is easy to use and nice and compact and resolves the first issue and part of the second issue, but it doesn't help with the moments generated by trailering and how these get transmitted to your transom. The transom saver, since the motor is supported on both ends, will reduce/eliminate the moments that are supported by the transom but may apply forces to your lower unit that are atypical at the contact points for the transom saver. Whether or not you think this is important depends on how severe you think the loads from trailering might be. I contend that the forces are higher, but the moments may not be. Since normal operation applies the force at the prop, that produces a significant moment on the transom (the lever arm is the total length of the engine). During trailering the forces act at the center of gravity of the engine which is probably much closer to the power head, so the lever arm is shorter. Therefore the moments generated during trailering could be the same or even smaller than those generated during operation even thought the forces are much higher. I suppose I would conclude that the transom saver is probably more effective but it may also be overkill and the wedge and/or 2x4 is probably just fine. In fact I may go back to the wedge style simply for ease of use and storage.
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Re: Transom Savers on boats

Postby pukahd » April 30th, 2015, 6:40 pm

My belief is that this kick stand motor supports puts a huge amount of pressure on the transom. Every bump and the constant shaking of the motor will eventually weaken the transom.

I use the support that comes with the rubber v and supports the lower end. There is a rubber strap that secures the v mount to the lower end. The other end supports rest on the trailer roller. . I don't know if I'm doing it correctly but I feel that getting as much of the weight off the transom AND the motors hydraulic lift supports will save the transom.....thus transom saver.
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Re: Transom Savers on boats

Postby cksea » May 1st, 2015, 9:27 am

I used the kickstand for years with no issues (Evinrude 115). On my last boat I towed with the motors down, that's the best way if your trailer is high enough.
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Re: Transom Savers on boats

Postby chris oak » May 8th, 2015, 8:18 pm

This is the one I got:
http://www.amazon.com/Extreme-Max-3001- ... nsom+saver

I welded together a rectangular shaped bar that fits over the last beam on the trailer since I don't have a roller and the other attachment meant drilling more holes in that beam which didn't thrill me. This one doesn't have shocks in it which I don't like, but it does have a gigantic rubber piece that sits on the motor and I also padded the part that sits on the beam so hopefully that will take up some of the shock. At the least the weight is now off my transom and my motor doesn't look like it's going to fall off by using the kickstand on long trips.
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