Bleeding Tuna

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Bleeding Tuna

Postby chris oak » April 29th, 2019, 7:06 pm

Scott Darnell posted a really cool link on facebook from a tuna company that was talking about bleeding out tuna out of an artery. You might have to scroll down the page, it also had info on braining tuna there and also braining tuna before you bleed them out (I do this with all of my fish as the heart usually keeps beating for a while and I don't want the fish to suffer).

Unfortunately the facebook link didn't work, here's the info and some pix:
How deep do you cut when bleeding a tuna? The artery you are aiming to cut is really close under the skin as shown in the first picture. The best place to cut is just behind the pectoral fin, shown in the second pic - remember to do both sides. Finally, given how shallow the artery is, a short knife is all that is needed, like the one in the third pic. Insert the knife, give it a quick flick up and out, this will start the blood flowing out from the fish. If you go to deep some of the blood will just pool back into the meat. Also remember to spike the brain BEFORE bleeding.
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Re: Bleeding Tuna

Postby fishst3w » April 30th, 2019, 6:48 pm

Why brain before bleeding? Is it just to be humane? I always figured that bleeding first helped the heart actively pump more of the blood out of the fish and since I rip the entire gills out I figure the fish bleeds out fast enough to lose consciousness pretty much immediately anyway and all the twitching may look horrible but is just nerves. Maybe my logic is flawed but that’s the way I always saw it.
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Re: Bleeding Tuna

Postby NaClAddict » May 1st, 2019, 10:23 am

Thrashing heats up the meat and causes damage in a number of ways. Fish lack the chemoreceptors to feel pain. Meat is murder, ya gotta be a little cold blooded. It’s all about the sashimi.
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Re: Bleeding Tuna

Postby fishst3w » May 1st, 2019, 11:09 am

NaClAddict wrote:Thrashing heats up the meat and causes damage in a number of ways. Fish lack the chemoreceptors to feel pain. Meat is murder, ya gotta be a little cold blooded. It’s all about the sashimi.


I completely agree with all of that. I'm still pretty quick to brain them to stop them trashing around ASAP, but pulling then entire gill system also calms them down quite a bit for that little bit of extra time I'm letting them bleed with the heart still pumping. Almost always, the first thing I do when I get my hands on the fish is get my hands under the gill plate and grab hold of the gills which really gets them under control, then I pull the gills out, run the stringer through them and remove the shaft or slip tip and then brain them. By the time I brain yellows, which is usually within a minute or so of getting my hands on the fish, they have usually bled out to the point that the entire fish is pale and sometimes almost white. I also feel like I can see a visible difference in the color of the meat when I fillet them if I bleed first and then brain vs. when I used to brain them right away. I could also see a difference in the meat between the wahoo I shot and processed this way and the ones my buddy brained first and then bled last time I was in Baja.

Of course I could be wrong or missing something, which is why I'm so curious to hear other people's thoughts, but that's the logic behind why I do things the way I do....
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Re: Bleeding Tuna

Postby VangysWay » May 1st, 2019, 3:38 pm

fishst3w wrote:
NaClAddict wrote:Thrashing heats up the meat and causes damage in a number of ways. Fish lack the chemoreceptors to feel pain. Meat is murder, ya gotta be a little cold blooded. It’s all about the sashimi.


I completely agree with all of that. I'm still pretty quick to brain them to stop them trashing around ASAP, but pulling then entire gill system also calms them down quite a bit for that little bit of extra time I'm letting them bleed with the heart still pumping. Almost always, the first thing I do when I get my hands on the fish is get my hands under the gill plate and grab hold of the gills which really gets them under control, then I pull the gills out, run the stringer through them and remove the shaft or slip tip and then brain them. By the time I brain yellows, which is usually within a minute or so of getting my hands on the fish, they have usually bled out to the point that the entire fish is pale and sometimes almost white. I also feel like I can see a visible difference in the color of the meat when I fillet them if I bleed first and then brain vs. when I used to brain them right away. I could also see a difference in the meat between the wahoo I shot and processed this way and the ones my buddy brained first and then bled last time I was in Baja.

Of course I could be wrong or missing something, which is why I'm so curious to hear other people's thoughts, but that's the logic behind why I do things the way I do....


Ditto. Exactly what I do every time and have found your exact results too.
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Re: Bleeding Tuna

Postby John Hughes » May 2nd, 2019, 5:19 pm

fishst3w wrote:
NaClAddict wrote:Thrashing heats up the meat and causes damage in a number of ways. Fish lack the chemoreceptors to feel pain. Meat is murder, ya gotta be a little cold blooded. It’s all about the sashimi.


I completely agree with all of that. I'm still pretty quick to brain them to stop them trashing around ASAP, but pulling then entire gill system also calms them down quite a bit for that little bit of extra time I'm letting them bleed with the heart still pumping. Almost always, the first thing I do when I get my hands on the fish is get my hands under the gill plate and grab hold of the gills which really gets them under control, then I pull the gills out, run the stringer through them and remove the shaft or slip tip and then brain them. By the time I brain yellows, which is usually within a minute or so of getting my hands on the fish, they have usually bled out to the point that the entire fish is pale and sometimes almost white. I also feel like I can see a visible difference in the color of the meat when I fillet them if I bleed first and then brain vs. when I used to brain them right away. I could also see a difference in the meat between the wahoo I shot and processed this way and the ones my buddy brained first and then bled last time I was in Baja.

Of course I could be wrong or missing something, which is why I'm so curious to hear other people's thoughts, but that's the logic behind why I do things the way I do....


Thanks for posting this up Chris. Really good to know.

I never brain my fish at all if I can help it. I want that heart to just pump and pump until there's no blood at all left. I've also noticed a big difference in fish that I've brained first vs bleed first.

Tell us why you need to brain the tuna first Chris.
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Re: Bleeding Tuna

Postby phil herranen » May 2nd, 2019, 6:48 pm

I think the real difference is if it's a line cought fish on a boat or speared and in the water . A tuna out of the water doing that vibration thing they do quickly heats the fish and burns the meat , that why when we fish albacore we have a ice slurry kill bag to cool them , if you dont the fish will be hot to the touch by the time they bleed out .

A speared fish is in water and limits the heat buildup because the water can pull the heat away very efficiently
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Re: Bleeding Tuna

Postby popgun pete » May 2nd, 2019, 7:32 pm

Here is a nice brochure. I push my kill knife into the head and then start on the gills, the fish does not always expire immediately and the blood still pumps out. At times with a lights out shot in the head they have had it immdeiately as their colors fade like throwing a switch and the body goes limp.
https://www.aqui-s.com/images/aquis/PDF ... 20tool.pdf
https://mk0kiguyasegc89yjtc8.kinstacdn. ... fshore.pdf

Here is another one which I had as a hard copy, but now a pdf. https://spccfpstore1.blob.core.windows. ... imi.pdf%22
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Re: Bleeding Tuna

Postby popgun pete » May 2nd, 2019, 8:15 pm

Whenever there is a market someone comes up with a gadget, check this thing out: https://www.ikigun.com/collections/ikig ... cts/ikigun
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Works something like a caulking gun in reverse I expect.
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Re: Bleeding Tuna

Postby phil herranen » May 2nd, 2019, 9:54 pm

popgun pete wrote:Whenever there is a market someone comes up with a gadget, check this thing out: https://www.ikigun.com/collections/ikig ... cts/ikigun
Image
Works something like a caulking gun in reverse I expect.

Something like that is used to quickly kill rabbits and chickens, the pin is spring loaded ,it is pressed against the back of the head and pull the trigger, the pin shots out and destroys the brain stem ,for a quick dispatch
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Re: Bleeding Tuna

Postby popgun pete » May 3rd, 2019, 2:37 pm

About 53 bucks plus shipping if you want to buy one.

In fact I just did "in the interests of science".

For divers something with a lance or dagger grip would be better in terms of underwater usage and storage.
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Re: Bleeding Tuna

Postby popgun pete » May 9th, 2019, 5:51 pm

The “IKiGUN” arrived today and the fat stainless steel pin sticking out the front end withdraws when you cock it by pulling the lime green hook and slide assembly backwards. That slide when released by pulling the trigger pushes the blunt pin forwards rapidly, which is only 5 cm long, and that may be a bit short for larger fish. You are meant to hold the fish against a hard backing surface before you pull the trigger with the “IKiGUN” gun pushed against its head. The “IKiGUN” gun is powered by woven elastic cord covered rubber bands, the fabric cover is there I assume to prolong the life of the bands by reducing their exposure to sunlight, however over time they will need to be replaced. The “IKiGUN” is more bulky than I thought it was, so I don’t really see it replacing a kill knife, plus it is a rather heavy item at 464 grams or 16.4 oz. and not something you could easily carry on your person.
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Re: Bleeding Tuna

Postby chris oak » May 16th, 2019, 2:28 pm

[quote="John Hughes"


Tell us why you need to brain the tuna first Chris.[/quote]

Sorry John I just saw this. I brain my fish first because of a few things. I don't want the fish to suffer, but also, even after braining the heart still beats. I'm using my chromebook because I'm at a conference so I can't post pix easily, but when you guys get a chance check out my seabass chunk in that mist story, it's pure white because there's very little blood on it.

I brain my fish and then immediately cut the area right under the gills, right above the heart. The fish will bleed out in a few moments. Normally if I don't need a weight, Ill go back to my boat and tie the fish on a special line that hangs off the side so I can work on it, it's way easier and doesn't make a mess on my boat. I''ll completely cut out the gills at this time and then cut and remove the organs and also scrub out the kidney. I prefer to ice the fish with sealed ice bottles if I can help it (you can't really do this with tuna as the body cavity will be so hot you will need to chill them down or drag them behind the boat), freshwater degrades the meat IMO. Usually my fish go in my fish bag with 2 or 3 jugs of ice in there and I never have problem with the fish.

When I'm shorediving I'll basically do the same but will go to the shallows to gut it as I don't like those 7 gills sneaking up on me.
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Re: Bleeding Tuna

Postby John Hughes » May 20th, 2019, 6:55 pm

chris oak wrote:[quote="John Hughes"


Tell us why you need to brain the tuna first Chris.


Sorry John I just saw this. I brain my fish first because of a few things. I don't want the fish to suffer, but also, even after braining the heart still beats. I'm using my chromebook because I'm at a conference so I can't post pix easily, but when you guys get a chance check out my seabass chunk in that mist story, it's pure white because there's very little blood on it.

I brain my fish and then immediately cut the area right under the gills, right above the heart. The fish will bleed out in a few moments. Normally if I don't need a weight, Ill go back to my boat and tie the fish on a special line that hangs off the side so I can work on it, it's way easier and doesn't make a mess on my boat. I''ll completely cut out the gills at this time and then cut and remove the organs and also scrub out the kidney. I prefer to ice the fish with sealed ice bottles if I can help it (you can't really do this with tuna as the body cavity will be so hot you will need to chill them down or drag them behind the boat), freshwater degrades the meat IMO. Usually my fish go in my fish bag with 2 or 3 jugs of ice in there and I never have problem with the fish.

When I'm shorediving I'll basically do the same but will go to the shallows to gut it as I don't like those 7 gills sneaking up on me.[/quote]

I noticed in that other thread how white the meat was. Whatever you're doing, it's working. I notice a distinct taste difference in fish that is well bled vs not. I normally just slash all the gills but I'm going to try slicing through that membrane under the gills and see if it makes a difference. Makes sense to me.
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