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gws drags diver

PostPosted: January 3rd, 2020, 3:15 pm
by chris oak
https://ftw.usatoday.com/2019/12/spearf ... hite-shark

I'm thinking he had a bouy with his fish stringer on it like they do in hawaii. He didn't want to drop his gun which was pretty foolish, had he gotten tangled trying to unclip the gun it would have ended badly.

Re: gws drags diver

PostPosted: January 3rd, 2020, 3:29 pm
by chris oak
Which brings up another thought. There are two thoughts when we are spearfishing, attaching a fish to a buoy or attaching it to your waist. When I'm hunting calicos or reefies I'll string several fish on my waist using a simple mono stringer. When Im hunting yellowtail or white seabass I rarely use a stringer unless I'm shore diving and if I do then I swim right back to the boat or shore after getting my fish. A lot of this is due to sea lions going after bigger pelagics, they will show no hesitation on grabbing your fish and dragging you to the bottom. We don't have to worry about sharks grabbing our fish YET but that might change over the next few years.

When my buddies are swimming back to the boat, if there is a sea lion harassing them I always go right to them to chase it off and I would do whatever it takes to make sure they were safe.

Re: gws drags diver

PostPosted: January 20th, 2020, 5:47 am
by John Hughes
chris oak wrote:Which brings up another thought. There are two thoughts when we are spearfishing, attaching a fish to a buoy or attaching it to your waist. When I'm hunting calicos or reefies I'll string several fish on my waist using a simple mono stringer. When Im hunting yellowtail or white seabass I rarely use a stringer unless I'm shore diving and if I do then I swim right back to the boat or shore after getting my fish. A lot of this is due to sea lions going after bigger pelagics, they will show no hesitation on grabbing your fish and dragging you to the bottom. We don't have to worry about sharks grabbing our fish YET but that might change over the next few years.

When my buddies are swimming back to the boat, if there is a sea lion harassing them I always go right to them to chase it off and I would do whatever it takes to make sure they were safe.


I like what the guy said at the end of the article "I had to get my float back to go spearfishing the next day" :eusa-clap:

I like the fish on my stringer for more control but after almost getting drowned by that bull furbag 2 years ago I'm second guessing that. I guess when you're a reel diver like myself, you don't really have an option.

Re: gws drags diver

PostPosted: January 20th, 2020, 11:02 am
by NaClAddict
Chris, I had a friend have a halibut shredded off his waist stringer by a 7 gill. I heard that shark was harvested for becoming too aggressive. There was a pic floating around Facebook of it. This was probably 10 years ago. The damage the shark did to the fish was scary. Especially considering how close it was to his nuts.

Re: gws drags diver

PostPosted: January 20th, 2020, 1:19 pm
by Bill Fkn McIntyre
I don't shore dive and I always take fish back to the boat. When hunting yellowtail or white sea bass I used to use a stringer sometimes simply to free up both hands when tryin to sort out kelp and shooting line messes on the surface. It was just to park the fish so it wouldn't sink or drift away while I worked. But I do worry about being connected to the fish if a sea lion or shark grabbed it.

A good alternative may be to orally inflate your Carter float and attach the fish to it. Or string the fish and attach the stringer to the float rather than to your belt.

Re: gws drags diver

PostPosted: January 20th, 2020, 2:21 pm
by John Hughes
Bill McIntyre wrote:A good alternative may be to orally inflate your Carter float and attach the fish to it..


Just make sure you've brained the fish and it is dead when you do this. I attached my popper to a fish deep a few years ago in stiff current. It was so tangled below 50' that it went absolutely nowhere with the float. I lost my knife on my second dive on it so I had to rip it out by hand. By the time I got it to the surface it had been over an hour and I was completely shook. I was floating on the surface and just put my head in the water, closed my eyes and tried to recover. Well, while I was doing that apparently the fish recovered as well. I had never brained it having no knife and when I looked up it had swam about 75 yrds down current. It took me a while to catch it as it had a head start. :bowrofl:

Re: gws drags diver

PostPosted: January 21st, 2020, 10:51 am
by dam
John Hughes wrote:
Bill McIntyre wrote:A good alternative may be to orally inflate your Carter float and attach the fish to it..


Just make sure you've brained the fish and it is dead when you do this. I attached my popper to a fish deep a few years ago in stiff current. It was so tangled below 50' that it went absolutely nowhere with the float. I lost my knife on my second dive on it so I had to rip it out by hand. By the time I got it to the surface it had been over an hour and I was completely shook. I was floating on the surface and just put my head in the water, closed my eyes and tried to recover. Well, while I was doing that apparently the fish recovered as well. I had never brained it having no knife and when I looked up it had swam about 75 yrds down current. It took me a while to catch it as it had a head start. :bowrofl:

LOL! :bowrofl:

Re: gws drags diver

PostPosted: January 28th, 2020, 12:04 pm
by Andrew
NaClAddict wrote:Chris, I had a friend have a halibut shredded off his waist stringer by a 7 gill. I heard that shark was harvested for becoming too aggressive. There was a pic floating around Facebook of it. This was probably 10 years ago. The damage the shark did to the fish was scary. Especially considering how close it was to his nuts.


I used to shrug off the 7 gills, but a friend had some seven gills get after him and a whiteseabass last year and it was pretty eye opening.

I still keep reef fish on a belt when I'm diving, but have found that it doesn't necessarily address the seal problem. I had a seal grab some rockfish when I was peering into a crack on the bottom and yank me back a few feet. My immediate thought was, "Oh, shit, this is it!" :eek3dance: I've tried to be better about getting the fish back to the kayak.