direct root watering

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direct root watering

Postby chris oak » March 14th, 2020, 7:34 am

These are a couple of pix of the pvc pipe going directly to the roots. I only do this when I'm starting out plants and the best results have been when I laid a bit of small gravel below the root, then put the pipe in and then the plant. I don't fertilized thru the pipe because I'm afraid of burning the roots.

The reed avocado was planted about a month ago, it's doing great and the box is because my soil isn't very good and I had to make sure it drained well. It worked out great because it rained like a mofo the last few days and it was flooded, if I had planted it in the soil I think I would've gotten root rot for sure. I love this tree and am thinking of getting another variety that I can prune to keep small, maybe a pinkerton.

The other tree is a citrus I planted about two years ago, its budding now and should bear fruit hopefully.
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Re: direct root watering

Postby Behslayer » March 14th, 2020, 1:24 pm

Hi Chris, thanks for posting. Always interested in learning about Gardening. On our land, I'm putting a hedge around the entire property. I'm not sure if I will need to Hog Fence off the entire property yet, so I'm putting in a Hedge of different varieties of Gardenias, Jasmines, Kwai Fah(Sweet Tea Olive), Coffee, Bannanas, that's over 200 plants. Plus I got Citrus Grove, Fruits trees, Nursery, Vegetable Garden. So, there's several hundred plants which need watering. I set up a very simple irrigation system. It's manual, no timers. I turn one valve and all the plants on the property are watered. Different plants have a different capacity watering Flag Drip valve which are inexpensive at Home Depot/Lowes. For example newly planted Shrubs, other smaller starting plants and vegetables, have a 1GPH one gallon per hour flow, while Fruit Tree starters have 4GPH, etc. I can isolate the different sections of the main Feeder Hoses if I want to isolate one particular group as I have several shut off valves at different joins and seperating different sections, so it is possible for me to water only the vegetables, etc.. We've had a heap of rain lately, but if it doesn't rain, I'll usually run the vegetables every 2 days and do everything with a deep soak every four days. It's not an exact science. If I close some valves other things will have more water supply, but it works out well enough an I can always check plants or groups by sticking a finger in the soil. All of these plants are covered in a thick layer of mulch but I keep the final thin hoses and Flag Drip Valves staked in place on top so I can make sure everything is working.

Every month or so I often move the Flag Drip Valves. Out from Center or to the other side of the plant. This encourages Root Growth. Like if my drip hose is only on the downhill side of the plant.. there's not as much reason for roots to extend to the uphill side of the plant. (Not a huge deal because it rains a lot).

Anyways. The Short of the Long of this post is I use a very simple, manual Drip Irrigation System. I can turn on one valve and water hundreds of plants. The whole thing cost me? @ $200 but I had to dig and put in alll my watering lines as this was a raw property. So that's several hundred feet of 5/8" Irrigation Tubing, 1/4" Rubber tubing, few hundred flag valves, Couplers, T's, Stop Ends, Shut Off Valves for the Tubing, a One Way Valve for the connection to the Water Outlet. For some this will be very old news, but for others, look up a few videos, and have a walk through Home Depot, Lowes, or your local Hardware/Gardening Store and don't be too intimidated. It's very simple if you go all manual. It can get more complicated if you like with Automatic Timers, Liquid Fertilizer Inputs, etc.. but with a simple manual shut off system, as long as you don't forget anything on... you won't find yourself with flooded plants and $1000 water bills. A few of the Drip Valve options are little sprayers for above ground. It's good to include a few of those right around where you would most notice them so you know if your water is on or not.
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Re: direct root watering

Postby Austin Balk » March 14th, 2020, 2:05 pm

I put in a laundry to landscape system when I landscaped my back yard in San Francisco. My neighborhood is built on sand and is notoriously hard to garden in. It cost me about $200 or less in materials (the city even had a program to subsidize it) and the time and energy to plan and install it. Super simple gravity-fed design. The water drains into mulch pits and you plant around them. You just have to use the right detergent. I’m only growing or ornamentals right now, but would love to get some food in the ground. Gophers are a problem and have eaten my tomatoes and it turns out that my dog really loves baby tree collards.
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Re: direct root watering

Postby Behslayer » March 17th, 2020, 10:59 am

Amazing the difference a few days scan make…

Today's projects.

-Transform my "Experimental Garden Patch" into a Vegetable Garden which can support a family with food using Succession planting of key crops such as Kale, Collard Greens, Pok Choy, Swiss Chard, Beans.
-Start a Seed to Starter system so that I have a steady stream of Succession plants every 4-6 weeks.

Crazy times. Good to have a Garden.

Ova there in Ca. I would be looking at the Nurseries, even Lowes/HD. For Starter Plants for Cool Crops like Brassicas (Kales/Collards/etc.), Sugar Snap Peas, Lettuces, I'd be making up a few Buckets of Potatoes.., Getting Potting Soil for Seed starters. Seeds will take a while, and now would be time to begin Seed Starting your Summer Crop.
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Re: direct root watering

Postby Andrew » March 17th, 2020, 1:10 pm

Behslayer wrote:Amazing the difference a few days scan make…

Today's projects.

-Transform my "Experimental Garden Patch" into a Vegetable Garden which can support a family with food using Succession planting of key crops such as Kale, Collard Greens, Pok Choy, Swiss Chard, Beans.
-Start a Seed to Starter system so that I have a steady stream of Succession plants every 4-6 weeks.

Crazy times. Good to have a Garden.

Ova there in Ca. I would be looking at the Nurseries, even Lowes/HD. For Starter Plants for Cool Crops like Brassicas (Kales/Collards/etc.), Sugar Snap Peas, Lettuces, I'd be making up a few Buckets of Potatoes.., Getting Potting Soil for Seed starters. Seeds will take a while, and now would be time to begin Seed Starting your Summer Crop.


100%. It's been a kick in the ass for me to start exactly the sorts of projects you mention, which I've been mulling over for some time but have not begun in earnest.

How're you going to set up your seed starter? I think that I could do it in the garage, but with nightly low temps in the high 30s and 40s, I'd need to figure out a way to maintain a much higher soil temp in the starter box.

I've also been dragging my feet on a few projects to keep unwanted visitors (deer, birds, rats, etc.) off of my berries and fruit trees. I'm not dragging my feet anymore.
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Re: direct root watering

Postby Andrew » March 17th, 2020, 1:14 pm

The other tree is a citrus I planted about two years ago, its budding now and should bear fruit hopefully.


My citrus trees and pomegranates have faked me out in the past. They'll experience a bud break and even flower but won't set fruit. I'm not sure whether this is indicative of immaturity or a nutritional deficiency. Curious to hear whether or not your two-year old citrus is able to produce this season. Fingers crossed.
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Re: direct root watering

Postby Behslayer » March 17th, 2020, 11:34 pm

I remember back in RI I had one of those Cheapo small Greenhouses like 3' x 2' and 5' tall with a few shelves and a zip up clear plastic cover. I think it was $20. Extremely flimsy, zipper would break with a sneeze, but for starting Seeds it worked well enough. Kept them warmer at night, no rain, can open the zipper during day. Ova here, I'll probably just start them on some tables near a window indoors just to keep anything from eating them. then graduate them to outdoors once they are a little bigger.

Got some stuff done. Put a Kaimana and a Bosworth Lychee Trees in the ground and a Haas Avocado Tree which had some real nice branching. This involves quite a bit of Straight bar work to get a nice deep, wide hole.. once the rocks are removed I make sure I have a deeper centered hole where I drop in a nice Mu or Uku Rack, then I'll add a lot of good compost to the remaining soil, place the tree, then ring the perimeter with rocks so that I can use a weed whacker against the rocks to cut any grass around the hole, and then cover with some wood chips from the Monkeypod Tree.

This little trailer gets a lot of use. These thick gauge Galvanized Hog Fence Panels make a great Trellis. 16' x 52" for $26 at Home Depot. Happy with the result. I'll add two more of these Trellises soon. This one has a variety of Cucumbers which should start climbing it tonight. The idea for these is that you rotate your crops you grow on them. So if I grow Cucumbers on this one now, I'll grow Melons or Squash or something different next and move the cucumbers to the next one. I'll also make one of these for Lilikoi/Passion Fruit which is a different situation as those Vines can live years. I like to lift the Fence off the ground a foot or more so that it gets the plants up off the ground. Nothing good ever came from having Cucumber and Squash Vines laying in the dirt. Can use these Trellises for so many things.. Cucumbers, Beans, Tomatoes, Squash, Zuchini, Melons, etc. Some people make nice Tunnels too..

Not sure if you can see in the pic, but that's my dive partner having anxiety about pulling the trigger with his little reef gun and reel on a @120# Yellowfin which buzzed us while reef diving. He hesitated.. and lost the chance. kicked himself in the balls after. But we did score some nice Reef fish.
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Re: direct root watering

Postby Andrew » March 18th, 2020, 8:16 am

Have you ever given pumpkins a shot on a trellis? I've done well with winter squashes in the past on the ground, but I'm intrigued by your use of a trellis for melons & gourds.
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Re: direct root watering

Postby Behslayer » March 18th, 2020, 9:52 am

This Trellis is designed for Heavier items. When you grow heavy items on a trellis, you can cradle them. Use something like a netting or a piece of cloth which you can hang them in on the trellis. Most things will not need it, but for bigger heavier items. I've seen some amazing pictures of people using the Hog Fence Panels for making an Arch Trellis where Gourds, etc hang down and you can walk through. Especially nice for kids.

This is a Very Sturdy set up. 4x4 Pressure treated Beams sunk 2' into the ground. I didn't use Cement. Instead I covered the Bottom of the Beam with heavy plastic bag material and then taped it up very well with heavy duty packing tape. The Beams are connected by Wire and then tightened down using two turnbuckles on either end which are connected to 4' stakes sunk on an angle. It's very sturdy without the Hog Fence, which just adds to it's integrity. I fasten the hog fence with fairly large Fence Post U nails. I figure My kids could climb up this.. probably while I'm not looking they will to grab some Passion fruit etc..

Have a look at this Youtube Page. This is where I got the idea for this kind of Trellis.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPVn9b ... MKjPrEsIOw
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Re: direct root watering

Postby Behslayer » March 19th, 2020, 4:57 pm

Did the math on that Trellis as I am building another one now.

3pc 8' x 4" x 4" Pressure Treated x $11
10pc Eye Screw x $1.25
4pc Turnbuckle x $2
(half roll of wire) x $5
4pc 4' Stakes x $3.50
1pc 16' x 52" Galvanized Hog Fence x $27

$100

at Home Depot. Might be cheaper on Mainland.
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